Now Here Comes the Predator: The Man of Steel #5 Comic Review

Credits:

Written by: Brian Michael Bendis

Art by: Adam Hughes
Jason Fabok (pg. 8-11)

Colors by: Adam Hughes

Alex Sinclair (pg. 8-11)

Cover by: Joe Prado, Ivan Reis, Alex Sinclair

The Run-Down

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are only two major developments in the three-act drama of this issue. After Superman used his solar flare power, he took Zaar to the moon. Well almost…about half-way to the moon, Zaar regained consciousness and punched Supes so hard he created a new lunar crater. Supergirl finds him after working with the Justice League to handle the city fires. After she rescues an unconscious Superman, back at the Hall of Justice, Batman and Superman discover Zaar’s secret plan. Will they be able to stop it in time? Also, Superman may have discovered new insight as to Zaar’s identity and background.


Plot of the Panel:

The artwork by issue five in this mini-series has far outpaced the narrative development. Adam Hughes, veteran DC artist brings a level of intensity and brutality to Round 2 of Zaar vs. Superman. He uses all-red panels to increase the intensity of the blows and to highlight the serious damage that Superman endures. The best aspect of Hughes’ illustration of Zaar as ‘the ultimate predator’ is how Hughes uses shadow and shading to cloak Zaar in the darkness of space and his surrounding environment. This gives Zaar a cool camouflage effect in battle.

I still feel like the plot is being rushed overall. It seems that now would have been the perfect time to dive into Zaar’s motives and background. However, what we get is a really cool continuation of the battle started in the previous issue. I don’t think I’m invested in the character they’ve built so far. I find myself wondering after each issue, ‘why is he doing all this?”

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Damon Cagnolatti

Damon Cagnolatti

An avid comic-book reader and super-rap nerd, he draws on the transformative traditions of Hip Hop and comics culture to bridge the gap of cognitive dissonance to a funky rhythm kicked with "pen, coin, and voice". On the weekends, he enjoys growing fresh fruits and veggies; a real low-key farmer in his backyard.
Summary
This mini-series is Bendis’ introduction to the DC landscape, and it shows! There isn’t much revealed in this issue regarding lingering questions from earlier plot threads: what happened to Jon and Lois? What’s the beef between Zaar and Krypton? Does Zaar have real political motivations to move against Krypton? Moreover, it’s hard for me to fully buy into the Zaar as a top-tier Superman villain. He just seems like the average run-of-the-mill villains. More of a Superman Revenge Squad-level villain, than a Doomsday-level threat. To say the least, I think the character deserves more development; I would start with his backstory as a soldier and show how he became so politically driven and anticapitalist.
Good
  • Clean panel lay-outs
  • Amazing 2pg spreads
  • Colors and artwork
  • Narrative pacing
Bad
  • Flat storytelling and plot
  • Very little development of the plot, characters, backstory, themes overall
  • Villains motives remain unexplored and unclear.
7.5
Good
Art - 10
Cohesiveness - 7
Plot Structure - 6
Design - 9
Accessibility for New Readers - 8
Character Development - 5
Written by
An avid comic-book reader and super-rap nerd, he draws on the transformative traditions of Hip Hop and comics culture to bridge the gap of cognitive dissonance to a funky rhythm kicked with "pen, coin, and voice". On the weekends, he enjoys growing fresh fruits and veggies; a real low-key farmer in his backyard.

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